Thursday, September 8, 2011

Dil dhoondhta hai phir wahi (Mausam)

At times, music works like an incredibly potent time-travelling machine. This particularly song, for example, takes me back to the time when we were kids, living in the (at that time) picturesque little Doctor's Colony of Rewa. Not because the Rewa is an idyllic town situated in the Himalayas (it's not); but because Mom had a cassette with this song, which she often played - and in my mind the song has become deeply correlated with my childhood home with its quaint backyard and garden.

It's not as if, at the age of 8 or 10, we were able to comprehend the depth of the lyrics or enjoy the pace of Bhupinder's unhurried vocals. If anything, I probably hated this 'sad' song... But I digress!

The song is an ode to the days when life was leisurely, when minds were uncluttered, when skies were bluer, and when you could lay idle without thinking that's you're getting left behind in a supersonic world.


Image source
Lyrics, and translation: 
Dil dhoondhta hai, phir wahi, fursat ke raat din
Baithe rahein, tasavvur-e-jaana kiye hue
[[Once more, my heart yearns for those leisurely days
When time was spent sitting around, doing nothing but thinking of the face of my beloved.]]
- This verse (once again) was originally written by the peerless Ghalib. Gulzar took it forward from there.

JaaDon ki narm dhoop aur, aangan mein let kar
Aankhon pe kheench kar tere, aanchal ke saaye ko
Aundhe paDe rahein kabhi, karwat liye hue
[[In the soft sunlight of the winters, lying about idly in the courtyard
(Trying hard to keep sleeping in the glaring sunlight)
Covering my eyes by pulling your aanchal (scarf?) over them
At times lying face down, at others curled up on one's side]]

Yaa garmiyon ki raat jo, purwaaiyaan chalein
ThanDee safed chaadaron par, jaagein der tak
Taaron ko dekhte rahein, chhat par pade hue
[[Also, in breezy summer nights 
Staying awake till late in night on the cool white sheets,
Just lying on the roof, gazing at the stars]]

Barfeeli sardiyon mein, kisi bhi pahaaD par
Waadee mein goonjti hui, khaamoshiyaan sune
Aankhon mein bheege bheege se, lamhe liye hue
[[On some distant mountain in the snowy winters
Listening to echoing silences of the valleys
Eyes brimming over with moist moments]] 
- 'Moist' is a really bad word to use here. But you get the context :)

Read forward at your own risk, 'cause the next lines are written by me. (Of course, while trying to stay true to the spirit of the original ones):

Galiyon mein baarishon mein, bach kar chalo jo tum
Hans dein hum, dhaani chunri pe chheente uchhaal kar
Dekha karein, aankhein teri shikwe liye hue
[[You, walking carefully in the bylanes during rains
And me, splashing your green chunri with water
Looking at your eyes filled with mock indignation]]
-- 'Dhaani' is a particular shade of green, quite similar the green of paddy fields.

Phir gungune patjhadon mein, shaakhein chuna karein
Yaaron ke beech baith ke; yaadein buna karein
Chuskiyon mein chaai ki, ghul kar hanste hue
[[Then lazily collecting dried twigs in the warm fall season
Sitting among friends, weaving memories
Sipping tea, laughing without a worry]]

Dil dhoondhta hai, phir wahi, fursat ke raat din.........

Hope you liked the translation, and bore with the lines I put up. Now go ahead, and take some time out to enjoy the world around you. :)

39 comments:

  1. I personally believe that in order to get the nectar of this song, one has to actually lead some busy life for a little bit. then the real essence and the core meaning of this poetry will not be a big deal to digest. otherwise it's not a song which will go down easily with everyone. even I didn't liked this song the first time I heard it. but now, when I'm away from my house for months in a row, I feel the burn. and the line 'tasavvur-e-jaana liye hue' is so b'fully written and so well b'fully desvribed by u. nice going :) Regards

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  2. @Rahul:
    that's very true :)
    thanks for your comments :)

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  3. sunder rachana hai

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  4. thank u mausi. padhne ke liye bhi :)

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  5. I didn't like it either when this song used to come in chitrahaar.

    It is not among my favorites but I like it now.

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  6. @Bhav:
    perhaps, as u grow up, u'd like this song even more :P

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  7. there are two versions of this song-one is this & the other is a 'happy' duet sung by lata mangeshkar & bhupinder. more enchanting is the fact that the same words in the same sequence are used to describe two opposite 'Mausams' of life-one fond rememberance & the other-a longing. but your added lines are superb.tresa

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  8. Thanks Tresa di. I've heard the happy version too, but this one's stuck in my memory, as it was the one present in that old cassette we had :D

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  9. @Arohan:
    What self deprecation? :-o

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  10. Wow.. beautiful blog and ur own words as added to this song are lovely... u really do get this song in all its enchanted ness..

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  11. The lines you added are amazing. I never really thought they were not part of the original song until I read your comment. They simply go with the flow.

    You missed your calling, I can tell you that. :)

    -Asghar (Karachi)

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  12. I love both the versions of this song. And I think, you have caught the very essence of the lyrics.Well done.For Gulzar Saheb,, i have no words to describe his mastery in weaving beautiful verses. he is simply magical with words.

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  13. The original by Chacha Ghalib is meant to have a comma in the first line:

    jee dhoondhta hai phir vohi fursat, ke raat din
    baithe rahe tasavvur-e-jaanaa kiye hue...

    So, it is not really 'fursat ke raat-din' but more of 'raat din baithe rahe'. Otherwise the second line does not flow from the first without an additional 'ke'.

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    1. There is no comma after fursat in Dewan e Galib. The first misra ends in ...fursat kay rat din and second misra is baithe rahein tasawurey.....

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  14. You did try but Tasawure Jannan does not mean looking at the face of beloved. Urdu ki eisi ki taisi kardi aap nay. Sorry for not being polite. Tasawur can be same as khayal (Urdu again) or the best fit in English is contemplation. Mohd Amin Beg mabeg51@gmail.com

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    1. Hey, thanks for pointing that out. I did come to realize my mistake some time back, but forgot to correct it. Thanks for reminding :)

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  15. Truly beautiful translation, and as many have said, extension of the original!
    Thank you!

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  16. loved the translation and amazing addition done by you..almost matching the beauty created by Gulzar ji..

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  17. The song together with your translation took me somewhere else....
    Somehow Ruskin bond and Gulzar seem to have the same effect on me,both of them make me nostalgic.


    I'm forever grateful to you.I've read a poem today.Thought it may add to the mood here..

    The pure, the beautiful, the bright,
    That stirred our hearts in youth,
    The impulse to a wordless prayer,
    The dreams of love and truth,
    The longings after something lost,
    The spirit’s yearning cry,
    The strivings after better hopes,—
    These things can never die.

    Sarah Doudney

    Thanks once again.

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    1. Thank you, that's a beautiful poem!
      And I agree about the Ruskin Bond part, he does induce nostalgia with his words :)

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  18. Kanupriya, I am lucky to have chanced upon your blog...i am deeply in love with Gulzar sahab's works...and you blog has made my life all the more easier!!

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    1. Hi Roohie,
      I'm glad you liked my blog :)

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  19. The opening sher (2 lines) is by Ghalib.He often does it beautifully. In one song he acknowledges it by saying, "Ghalib teri zameen pe likhi hai...ghazal.." don't remember the song.
    ditto with "rah main chalte hain....khush raho ...hum to safar karte hain (namkeen) is Zafar's.
    Thanks for the lovely blog.

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    1. Hey Vandy,
      Thanks for the helpful comments! I love "Raahon pe rahte hain"
      :)

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    2. Vandy -

      The line you are referring to is not by Ghalib himself. Ghalib is mentioned in it by Muzaffar Warsi - in his very popular ghazal sung by Jagjit Singhji
      "Mana ke musht-e-khak se bhadkar nahi Hun mein"

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  20. From the year 1975-76 this songs remains one of my favorite till date.
    The line
    "ThanDee safed chaadaron par, jaagein der tak
    Taaron ko dekhte rahein, chhat par pade hue"

    reminds me of my child hood days when we used to go to roof for sleep.
    Your next two stanza are also great and fits the line of the song.

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    Replies
    1. Hey!
      Yes, the song is so reminiscent of older days :)
      Glad you liked my stanzas too!

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  21. Have always loved this song...as a child for the melody...as a young adult for the melancholy chords touched by the sublime mellifluous voice of Bhupinder...and later for the sheer weight of the lyrics. Googled today for finding the meaning of a couple of words which had till now remained a little incomprehensible and landed up with your page.

    What a great peace of luck!!! You deserve kudos for daring to fiddle with Gulzar and also for doing a fantastic job. Even Gulzar saheb would approve. The second stanza was not as good as the first though!!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Have always loved this song...as a child for the melody...as a young adult for the melancholy chords touched by the sublime mellifluous voice of Bhupinder...and later for the sheer weight of the lyrics. Googled today for finding the meaning of a couple of words which had till now remained a little incomprehensible and landed up with your page.

    What a great peace of luck!!! You deserve kudos for daring to fiddle with Gulzar and also for doing a fantastic job. Even Gulzar saheb would approve. The second stanza was not as good as the first though!!

    ReplyDelete
  23. I hummed the stanzas u composed ...felt odd at first but with a few tweaks they fit very well. Added Baarish and Pathjhad ke mausam...nice !

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  24. Wow, I Am in eternal love of Gulzar San work. Beautifully translated and your own lines fit wonderfully. Thanks

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